Event Archive

Monday, October 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Lewis Lab, Room 270
In a typical Japanese village, Yoichi Ono lives with his wife, Izumi and his parents. The Ono family live a frugal, but happy life as dairy farmers living in the peaceful village. One day the worst earthquake in history strikes causing a nearby nuclear power station to explode. Their neighbors, who live within the range of the nuclear power station, are forcibly ordered to evacuate by the government. But the Ono family have only half of their garden designated as within range. They then have to make a hard decision whether to take refuge or not.
 
The film, which is examining a highly relevant subject, describes the mental anguish of the family. A family that is forced to separate by an extremely unfortunate event beyond their control. The past, the present, and the future of the two couples from different generations rises to the surface. [Synopsis © Third Window Films] (133 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
 
Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff
 
For more information:
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 4:00pm
Linderman Library, Room 200
Guobin Yang
Grace Lee Boggs Professor of Communication & Sociology
Annenberg School for Communication & Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania
 
The Red Guard Generation in China fell from grace when Mao put an end to the Red Guard movement in 1968 and sent youth of the generation away from cities to become peasants in rural areas. Based on the book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that youth managed a deep identity crisis by turning private media such as letters and banned books into a means of personal expression and social connection. This history has far-reaching implications for understanding media, community, and solidarity in times of dejection.
 
Guobin Yang is the Grace Lee Boggs Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also a faculty in the Graduate Group of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. He is the author of The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016) and The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009). His Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2003) is an annotated English translation of the 6th-century Chinese classic of rhetoric and literary theory Wenxin Diaolong.
 
Co-sponsor: Visiting Lecturers Committee

 

For more information:
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 4:00pm
Neville Hall, Room #003
Customs agents discover a huge amount of human hair along with the bald corpse of a young girl.  This arouses the curiosity of Yamazaki (Ren Ohsugi), a mortuary employee with a hair fetish, particularly since the girl’s hair continues to grow.  Now a mad hair-peddler with an endless stock of locks, Yamazaki hocks his wares to salons to be used for hair extensions.  Meanwhile, Yuko (Chiaki Kuriyama, KILL BILL Vol 1, BATTLE ROYALE), an up-and-coming hair stylist, is entrusted with the care of her timid and frightened niece, Mami, whose body bears the signs of abuse.  It’s not long before death surrounds them and their extension-wearing clientele.  The hair, it seems, has a life of its own, with lethal, vengeful intentions.  And Yuko and Mami must untangle the mystery before more deaths occur.  Directed by Sion Sono (SUICIDE CLUB), HAIR EXTENSIONS will make your hair stand on end! [Synopsis © Tokyo Shock] (108 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
 
Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff
 
For more information contact Professor Kyoko Taniguchi, kyt213@lehigh.edu
 
Co-sponsored by MLL/Asian Studies
For more information:
Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 10:00am
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
 
ZAINICHI LITERATURE WORKSHOP
Roemmele Global Commons | Williams Hall | Lehigh University
April 21-22, 2017 All Day 
Registration Required. 
 
APRIL 21
10:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Session 1: Change and Continuity Across the “August 1945” Divide
 
Andre Haag, “‘Good Korean’ or Race Traitor? Reorienting ‘Zainichi’ Writing from Futei Senjin to Sangokujin”
 
Jonathan Glade, “Fissuring Literary Boundaries: The Emergence of Zainichi Literature under the US Military Occupation”
 
Christina Yi, “Postcolonial Legacies and the Divided ‘I’ in Occupation-Period Japan”
 
Yinan He, Discussant, Associate Professor of International Relations, Lehigh University 
 
1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Session 2: Transnationality, Intersectionality, Anti-Imperialism
 
Nathaniel Heneghan, “Digitizing Ethnic Identity-Gender and Performativity in Recent Zainichi Cinema” 
 
Nobuko Yamasaki, “A Zainichi Woman’s Body as a Battlefield”
 
Amardeep Singh, Discussant, Associate Professor of English, Lehigh University
 
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Open Discussion
 
APRIL 22
10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Session 3: Cold War Culture and Literary Activism (in Japanese)
 
Koji Toba, “The Circle Movement in the 1950s and its Imaginative Power in East Asia”
 
Shoya Unoda, “Cultural Activism by Zainichi Koreans in 1950s Japan: Between the Japanese Archipelago and the Korean Peninsula”
 
Hideto Tsuboi, Discussant, Professor of Japanese Literature, International Research Center for Japanese Studies
 
1:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Session 4: Ideologies of Gender and Language in Literary Production
 
Cindi Textor, “The Place of Language, the Language of Place: Narrative Voice as Traveler-Translator in Yi Yangji's Yuhi
 
Catherine Ryu, “Savoring the Apple Leitmotif: Gender, Desire, and Identity in Yi Yang-Ji’s Yuhi and Kim Ch’ang-Saeng’s ‘Akai mi’”
 
Taïeb Berrada, Discussant, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, Lehigh University
 
 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Open Discussion
 
Sponsors: Lehigh University-Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Asian Studies, Humanities Center and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; The Northeast Asian Council (NEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) with the support of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC); Asian Studies Center, International Studies Program, Michigan State University; The Center for Korean Research, Columbia University;The Center for Japanese Studies, The University of Hawaii; The Department of Asian Studies, The University of British Columbia
 
Special Thanks to Han Cholsu and Kim Sungwoong
For more information:
Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:00am
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
ZAINICHI LITERATURE WORKSHOP
Roemmele Global Commons | Williams Hall | Lehigh University
April 21-22, 2017 All Day 
Registration Required. 
To register visit https://zainichiliterature.wixsite.com/2017
 
APRIL 21
10:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Session 1: Change and Continuity Across the “August 1945” Divide
 
Andre Haag, “‘Good Korean’ or Race Traitor? Reorienting ‘Zainichi’ Writing from Futei Senjin to Sangokujin”
 
Jonathan Glade, “Fissuring Literary Boundaries: The Emergence of Zainichi Literature under the US Military Occupation”
 
Christina Yi, “Postcolonial Legacies and the Divided ‘I’ in Occupation-Period Japan”
 
Yinan He, Discussant, Associate Professor of International Relations, Lehigh University 
 
1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Session 2: Transnationality, Intersectionality, Anti-Imperialism
 
Nathaniel Heneghan, “Digitizing Ethnic Identity-Gender and Performativity in Recent Zainichi Cinema” 
 
Nobuko Yamasaki, “A Zainichi Woman’s Body as a Battlefield”
 
Amardeep Singh, Discussant, Associate Professor of English, Lehigh University
 
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Open Discussion
 
APRIL 22
10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Session 3: Cold War Culture and Literary Activism (in Japanese)
 
Koji Toba, “The Circle Movement in the 1950s and its Imaginative Power in East Asia”
 
Shoya Unoda, “Cultural Activism by Zainichi Koreans in 1950s Japan: Between the Japanese Archipelago and the Korean Peninsula”
 
Hideto Tsuboi, Discussant, Professor of Japanese Literature, International Research Center for Japanese Studies
 
1:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Session 4: Ideologies of Gender and Language in Literary Production
 
Cindi Textor, “The Place of Language, the Language of Place: Narrative Voice as Traveler-Translator in Yi Yangji's Yuhi
 
Catherine Ryu, “Savoring the Apple Leitmotif: Gender, Desire, and Identity in Yi Yang-Ji’s Yuhi and Kim Ch’ang-Saeng’s ‘Akai mi’”
 
Taïeb Berrada, Discussant, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, Lehigh University
 
 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Open Discussion
 
Sponsors: Lehigh University-Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Asian Studies, Humanities Center and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; The Northeast Asian Council (NEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) with the support of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC); Asian Studies Center, International Studies Program, Michigan State University; The Center for Korean Research, Columbia University;The Center for Japanese Studies, The University of Hawaii; The Department of Asian Studies, The University of British Columbia
 
Special Thanks to Han Cholsu and Kim Sungwoong

 

 
 
 
 
For more information:
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 4:00pm
Inspired by the best-selling manga and anime series, Death Note: L, change the WorLd reveals how the legendary detective “L” spends the final days of his life.  Directed by master J-horror filmmaker Hideo Nakata, Kenichi Matsuyama once again stars as L.
 
L has finally solved the “Kira” case in which countless criminals had died under mysterious circumstances, but sacrificed his own life in order to stop Kira, leaving himself with only 23 days left to live.  
 
For his final case, L goes up against a bio-terrorist group trying to wipe out humanity with a deadly mutated virus.  As L tries to formulate an antidote with a scientist, he must also save the lives of two children who have no one else to turn to.  Will L be able to save the world before it’s too late?  Witness the last 23 days of L.  [Synopsis © VIZ Pictures]
 
(129 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
 
Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.
 
For more information:
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 4:00pm
Williams Hall, Room 070
Asian Studies Travel Grant recipients will be  sharing their experiences.
 
Light Refreshments Served
 
For more information:
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 4:00pm
Lewis Lab, Room 316
The sequel to the phenomenal hit movie Death Note (directed by renowned filmmaker Shusuke Kaneko), Death Note II: The Last Name concludes the titanic battle between the two geniuses L and Light.
 
Light Yagami has joined the investigation team in pursuit of the serial killer known as “Kira.”  While L strongly suspects Light is “Kira,” Light continues to seek out L’s real name so he can kill him using the Death Note.  Things get more unpredictable with the appearance of a second “Kira” who possesses the “Eyes of the Death God,” which enable the owner to see the true identity and life span of any person.
 
Light soon learns the identity of the second “Kira” and wants to join forces to get rid of L.  Will L be able to unmask “Kira” before he gets killed?  Which name will be the last written in the Death Note?  [Synopsis © VIZ Pictures] (140 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
 
 
Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff
 
 
* Extra Credit Event for Japanese Language Class!
Presented by Professor Kyoko Taniguchi
kyt213@lehigh.edu·Office: Williams 488
Co-sponsored by MLL/Asian Studies
 
 
For more information:
Monday, February 20, 2017 - 4:00pm
Neville Hall, Room 003

Adapted from a highly popular manga, with original characters and plot twists developed only for live-action film, Death Note finally comes to life, directed by the renowned monster film master Shusuke Kaneko with a theme song by Red Hot Chili Peppers. 

Ace student Light Yagami finds the Death Note, a notebook intentionally dropped by a rogue “Shinigami” death god named Ryuk.  Any human whose name is written in the notebook dies.  Upset with the current justice system, Light takes matters into his own hands and vows to use the power of the Death Note to rid the world of all evil, and become “the God of the new world.”

A mysterious detective known only as “L” quickly learns that the serial killer, nicknamed “Kira” by the public, is located in Japan.  Light realizes that L will be his greatest enemy, and a game of psychological cat and mouse between the two begins. [Synopsis © VIZ Pictures] (120 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)

Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff

For more information:
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 4:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230

From acclaimed director Satoshi Kon (Perfect Blue, Millennium Actress) and Japan’s leading animation studio Mad House (X, Vampire Hunter D, Ninja Scroll) comes this visually and emotionally stunning tale of adventure, love, and redemption. In Tokyo, three homeless people’s lives are changed forever when they discover a baby girl at a garbage dump on Christmas Eve.  As the New Year fast approaches, these three forgotten members of society band together to solve the mystery of the abandoned child and the fate of her parents.  Along the way, encounters with seemingly unrelated events and people force them to confront their own haunted pasts, as they learn to face their future together. [Source: Sony Pictures] (92 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)  Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff 

For more information:
Traditional Japanese Biwa Music Performance by Yoko Hiraoka
Monday, October 31, 2016 - 4:00pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
Biwa storytellers have enthralled audiences with classic ghost stories from antiquity. Ms. Hiraoka chooses several of these tales and illustrates her sung performance with images from the stories. Stories include: Miminashi Hoichi; Hagoromo; and Yugao.
 
For more information:
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 4:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230
The best seller Kokuhaku [Confessions] garnered numerous publisher awards in 2009 in a hardcover edition of 700,000 copies.  Starting with the confession of a female teacher whose young daughter is killed by her students, the tale unfolds in a series of confessions by the key players as truth gets twisted and a series of terrifying, astounding, hair-raising events come to light.
 
This shocking work, already raising eyebrows from its incarnation in print now cranks it up a notch by being made as a movie!  Who would have imagined?  At the helm is the genius, Tetsuya Nakashima, renowned for the exquisite directorial style and superb work with actors in the films, Kamikaze Girls, Memories of Matsuko and Paco and the Magical Book. [Source: Toho] (106 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
 
Free & Open ONLY to Lehigh students/faculty/staff
 
Co-sponsored by Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and Asian Studies
 
For more information contact Professor Kyoko Taniguchi, kyt213@lehigh.edu
 
For more information:
Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 4:15pm
Williams Hall, Roemmele Global Commons
 
Interdisciplinary Academic Programs Welcome Back Mixer
Meets 5 x 10 Professional Growth and Success Requirement
 
Academic Programs
Africana Studies • Global Studies • Classical Studies Cognitive Science • Environmental Studies • Asian Studies Global Citizenship • Science, Technology & Society Health, Medicine & Society • American Studies Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies • Jewish Studies Sustainable Development • Latin American Studies
 
NEW STUDENTS learn how interdisciplinary studies can enhance your academic goals and declare a major or a minor
 
CURRENT STUDENTS re-connect with classmates and faculty
 
FACULTY an opportunity to meet students and answer questions
 
Light Refreshments Served
 
 
For more information:
Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - 4:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230

Selected for the prestigious Director’s Fortnight at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival and winner of Best Screenplay at the Kinema Jumpo Awards, Miwa Nishikawa’s (Wild Berries) Sway is a psychologically thrilling portrait of the severe dysfunction behind a family clinging to decorum and pride.

Takeru is a successful photographer living the good life in Tokyo. On the first anniversary of his mother’s death, he reluctantly sets off to visit his hometown. Once there, he runs into Chieko, the girlfriend he had left behind. Events turn when an accident involving Chieko causes Takeru’s brother, Minoru, to be arrested. A trial begins, and as it progresses, years of suppressed anger and betrayal come to the surface, revealing a gulf of jealousy and resentment between the brothers that threatens to tear their family apart. [KIMSTIM] (120 min. Japanese with English subtitles)

Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff

For more information:
Monday, April 11, 2016 - 4:00pm
Williams Hall, Room 070

Asian Studies Travel Grant recipients will be sharing their experiences. Light Refreshments Served

For more information:
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 4:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230

Paul Schrader’s visually stunning, collagelike portrait of acclaimed Japanese author and playwright Yukio Mishima (played by Ken Ogata) investigates the inner turmoil and contradictions of a man who attempted an impossible harmony between self, art, and society. Taking place on Mishima’s last day, when he famously committed public seppuku, the film is punctuated by extended flashbacks to the writer’s life as well as by gloriously stylized evocations of his fictional works. With its rich cinematography by John Bailey, exquisite sets and costumes by Eiko Ishioka, and unforgettable, highly influential score by Philip Glass, Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is a tribute to its subject and a bold, investigative work of art in its own right.
[Criterion Collection] (120 min. Japanese with English subtitles)

Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

For more information:
Monday, February 22, 2016 - 6:30pm
Williams Hall, Roemmele Global Commons

How do civil war commanders make their soldiers fight and risk their lives in combat? Why do some use physical violence to make their followers respond to orders, while others engage in complex psychological education and mental preparation? Why do some train their rank-and-file soldiers, while others simply hand them weapons without further preparations? And how do soldiers themselves respond to command structures and disciplinary systems? The lecture will provide answers to these questions and shed light on how power is reproduced in insurgent movements. It will explain the importance of social structure and, more precisely, the habitus of agents within the field of insurgency in maintaining hierarchy and command in organizing and enforcing consent. Commanders and soldiers, in this perspective, structure their disciplinary practice according to incorporated behavioral and cognitive schemes that relate to the social position of the respective agent and the patterns of his life course.

The lecture is based upon dozens of qualitative interviews with commanders and soldiers from three insurgent groups operating along the Thai-Cambodian border during the 1980s and 1990s. Using a technique called habitus hermeneutics, interviews were conducted with members of the Khmer People’s National Liberation Armed Forces (KPNLAF), the Armée Nationale Sihanoukiste (ANS), and the National Army of Democratic Kampuchea (NADK, better known as the Khmer Rouge). The lecture will provide insights into the social structure of these groups and how power becomes reproduced through disciplinary practice.

For more information:
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 4:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230

1958 Japanese film directed by Kon Ichikawa and adapted from the Yukio Mishima novel The Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Told in an intricate flashback structure, Enjo dramatizes the psychological collapse of Goichi (Raizo Ichikawa), a young Buddhist acolyte from a dysfunctional family who arrives at a Kyoto temple--the Golden Pavilion--for further study. Goichi is haunted by two events--the discovery of his psychologically abusive mother’s infidelity, and the effect of the revelation upon his father.
[New Yorker Video] (99 min. Japanese with English subtitles)

Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

For more information:
Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 12:00am

As part of International Week 2015, come visit a photography exhibition featuring girls’ education in Cambodia. All of the photographs were taken by Dr. Sothy Eng, Professor of Practice in the College of Education. This exhibit will be on display November 5th -14th at the Barnes and Noble Café in the bookstore. All photos will be for sale. All proceeds will benefit the Caring for Cambodia, Lehigh University Partnership.

Sponsored by: Asian Studies, CIE Club, Global Union, Sustainable Development Program, & Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 4:00pm
STEPS 280

In an analysis of the influence of a non-Chinese dynasty on the evolution of traditional Chinese architecture from the tenth century through the seventeenth century, Dr. Zuo will discuss the technical and artistic changes effected by the Mongol Yuan Dynasty (1215-1368) upon the “elegance” of Song Dynasty (960-1279) architecture and the legacy of that effect on Ming Dynasty (1368=1644) constructions.

Dr. Zuo is an architectural historian specializing in East Asian architecture and historic preservation.

For more information:
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 5:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230
From director Hideo Nakata (Ring, The Ring 2) and renowned Japanese novelist Koji Suzuki (The Ring), comes a film that brings out a new level of fear hidden in the depths and buried far from memory. [A.D. Vision]
 
Yoshimi Matsubara fights to gain legal custody of her five year-old daughter Ikuko while the two live together in a dark, sullen and musty apartment building. Already insecure and uncertain about her future with her daughter, Yoshimi is haunted by murky water dripping through the ceiling and walls, and by the almost taunting appearances of a small red bag that once belonged to a girl who had mysteriously disappeared two years prior. Though she desperately struggles to find the strength within herself for Ikuko's sake, her horror intensifies as she comes closer to discovering the connection between these events, and is completely unprepared for the truth that lies ahead. [WorldCat]
 
(101 min.  Japanese with English subtitles)
Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff
 
For more information:
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 4:00pm
Linderman Library, Room 200
The Wind in the Bamboo
Indigenous People Historically defined as “Negrito” Survive in Asia
 
Edith Mirante
Author/Activist
 
Author/activist Edith Mirante presents a slideshow related to her latest book, “The Wind in the Bamboo: A Journey in Search of Asia’s ‘Negrito’ Indigenous People”.Called “savage pygmies” and “hideous dwarfs,” sold into slavery, exhibited at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, nearly exterminated by disease and a cataclysmic volcano, these extraordinary people now survive as forest hunter gatherers in a few places: mainland Malaysia, the Philippines and India’s Andaman Islands. The slideshow features historical images and her own photographs, with an emphasis on the indigenous peoples’ 
adaptive modern foraging cultures, issues of ethnic identity, and ongoing forest land rights struggles. 
 
Edith Mirante has roamed Asia since the early 1980s, collecting information on human rights and environmental issues. In 1986 she founded Project Maje, an independent information project on Burma and she has testified before the US Congress, European Trade Commission and International Labor Organization. The LA Times has called her writing "a contribution to the literature of human rights and to the literature of high adventure.”
 
Co-sponsors: Center for Global Islamic Studies, Department of Journalism and Communication, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and Global Studies Program.

 

For more information:
Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 5:00pm
Chandler Ullmann Hall, Room 230
Jiro dreams of flying and designing beautiful airplanes, inspired by the famous Italian aeronautical designer Caproni. Nearsighted from a young age and unable to be a pilot, Jiro joins a major Japanese engineering company in 1927 and becomes one of the world’s most innovative and accomplished airplane designers, earning the respect of prominent industry greats, including Hattori and Kurokawa. The film chronicles much of Jiro’s life, depicting key historical events, including the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, the Great Depression, the tuberculosis epidemic and Japan’s plunge into war. Jiro meets and falls in love with Nahoko, and grows and cherishes his friendship with his colleague Honjo. Writer and director Hayao Miyazaki pays tribute to engineer Jiro Horikoshi and author Tatsuo Hori in this epic tale of love, perseverance, and the challenges of living and making choices in a turbulent world. [Disney] (126 min.  Japanese with English subtitles). Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.
 
For more information:
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:00pm
Williams Hall, Global Commons
 
Welcome Back Mixer: Interdisciplinary Academic Programs
Africana Studies
American Studies
Asian Studies
Global Studies
Classical Studies
Cognitive Science
Environmental Studies
Global Citizenship
Global Studies
Health, Medicine & Society
Jewish Studies
Latin American Studies
Science, Technology & Society
Sustainable Development
Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies
 
NEW STUDENTS: learn how interdisciplinary studies can enhance your academic goals, declare a major or a minor
 
CURRENT STUDENTS:re-connect with classmates and faculty
 
FACULTY: an opportunity to meet students and answer questions 
 
Light refreshments served
 
Monday, April 20, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

A thousand years after a global war, a seaside kingdom known as the Valley of The Wind remains one of only a few areas still populated. Led by the courageous Princess Nausicaä, the people of the Valley are engaged in a constant struggle with powerful insects called Ohmu who guard a poisonous jungle that is spreading across the Earth. Nausicaä and her brave companions, together with the people of the Valley, strive to restore the bond between humanity and the Earth. [Disney Movies] (116 min.  Japanese with English subtitles). Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff. 

For more information:
Monday, April 13, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Sophie, a quiet girl working in a hat shop, finds her life thrown into turmoil when she is literally swept off her feet by a handsome but mysterious wizard named Howl. The vain and vengeful Witch of the Waste, jealous of their friendship, puts a spell on Sophie. In a life-changing adventure, Sophie climbs aboard Howl's magnificent moving castle and enters a magical world on a quest to break the spell. [Disney Movies] (119 min.  Japanese with English subtitles). Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff. 

For more information:
Monday, April 6, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Paul Schrader’s visually stunning, collagelike portrait of acclaimed Japanese author and playwright Yukio Mishima (played by Ken Ogata) investigates the inner turmoil and contradictions of a man who attempted an impossible harmony between self, art, and society. Taking place on Mishima’s last day, when he famously committed public seppuku, the film is punctuated by extended flashbacks to the writer’s life as well as by gloriously stylized evocations of his fictional works. With its rich cinematography by John Bailey, exquisite sets and costumes by Eiko Ishioka, and unforgettable, highly influential score by Philip Glass, Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is a tribute to its subject and a bold, investigative work of art in its own right. [Criterion Collection] (120 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff. 

For more information:
Monday, March 30, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Set in ninth century Kyoto.  A nobleman is murdered, his bride is raped by a bandit.  These deeds are the subject of four different accounts, three by participants and one by an eye-witness.  Kurosawa uses a flashback technique to tell the four different versions of these events, and cynically shows the ability of human beings to twist the truth to preserve the idea they have of themselves.  The version of the witness, the woodcutter, is different to those of the three participants, and he emerges as the hero of the story. [WorldCat Database] (88 min.  Japanese with English subtitles). Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff 

For more information:
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 112

Asian Studies travel grant recipeints from 2014 spring, summer and fall and 2015 winter will be presenting.

For more information:
Monday, March 16, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

When an idealistic governor disobeys the reigning feudal lord, he is cast into exile, his wife and children left to fend for themselves and eventually wrenched apart by vicious slave traders. Under Kenji Mizoguchi’s dazzling direction, this classic Japanese story became one of cinema’s greatest masterpieces, a monumental, empathetic expression of human resilience in the face of evil.  [Criterion Collection] (124 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff. 

For more information:
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Consists of four stories of the supernatural based on Japanese folk material. In “The Black Hair,” a poor young samurai leaves his first wife to marry a rich woman. When he is unhappy in his second marriage, he returns to his first wife, who at first appears unchanged from when he last saw her. In “The Woman of the Snow,” a woodcutter is spared by a mysterious ghost-like woman in the snow, but must promise never to tell anyone what he has seen. In “Hoichi, the Earless,” a blind musician-monk named Hoichi is commanded by a gathering of ghosts to sing the saga of their ancient deeds. The head monk paints Hoichi's body with prayer verses to protect him, but unfortunately overlooks Hoichi's ears. In “In a Cup of Tea,” a writer wonders what would happen to a person who drinks another's soul and finds out. [WorldCat Database] (161 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

For more information:
Monday, February 23, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

THE KINGDOM OF DREAMS AND MADNESS is a fascinating, never-before-seen look inside the quirky and wonderful world of Studio Ghibli, creators of masterpieces like Princess Mononoke, My Neighbor Totoro and the Oscar-winning Spirited Away.  Granted near-unfettered access to the notoriously insular Studio Ghibli, director Mami Sunada follows the eminent director Hayao Miyazaki, producer Toshio Susuki and the elusive and influential “other director” Isao Takahata for a year as the studio rushes to complete two films, Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises and Takahata’s The Tale of The Princess Kaguya.  The result is a rare fly-on-the-wall glimpse of the inner workings of one of the world’s most celebrated animation studios and a rare insight into the dreams, passion and singular dedication of these remarkable creators.  [GKIDS] (118 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

For more information:
Monday, February 9, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Shows the life and loves of Hikaru Genji, a nobleman who was born the son of an emperor and later made a commoner.  He was the most handsome man in the nation with abilities in poetry and music that were unparalleled. [WorldCat Database] (108 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open only to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

For more information:
Monday, January 26, 2015 - 4:00pm
Maginnes Hall 113

Based on an award winning, best-selling manga series by Mari Yamazaki. Lucius (Abe), an architect of spa baths for the Roman Empire, inadvertently travels through time and finds himself in a modern Japanese bathhouse. He takes elements of Japanese culture that he learns there back with him to Rome and is hugely successful, which leads the Emperor to command him to build a massive spa.  [WorldCat]  (108 min.  Japanese with English subtitles) Free & Open ONLY to Lehigh students/faculty/staff.

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