Asian Studies Course Listing

Fall 2017 Course Listing
For Asian Studies courses requiring Department or Program Permission, please contact Dr. Kiri Lee at kjl2@lehigh.edu
 
ASIA, IR 061-10  East Asian International Relations  43083  4 credits  (SS) CBE Global  
Introduction to East Asian international relations, with emphasis on post-1945 period: historical background of Asian international system; Cold War conflicts; China's rise and regional responses; Japan's changing international role; the two Koreas; ASEAN and Asian regionalism; U.S. and Russian policies; current and future issues.  Professor He   W, F; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA, REL, GS 095-10  Muslim Asia in the 21st Centruty: Religion, Culture, Politics  44016  4 credits  (HU)   
Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the World now live in South and Southeast Asia.  In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as the deal with the novel  opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century.  We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.  
Professor Hussain   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL, HIST 096-10  Understanding Hong Kong  44204  4 credits  (HU)   
This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.  
Professor Chen   M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, SOC 114-10  Social Issues in Contemporary China  43287  4 credits  (SS) CBE Global  
Dramatic economic, cultural and social changes are underway in China today and have aroused much debate among social scientists East and West.  The following social issues are critical for understanding China's development trajectory: in equality and poverty; rapid demographic shifts; provision of health care services; provision of education services; and becoming an "information society."  We will explore how these issues intersect with old hierarchies in China, urban-rural differences, and gender differences.  Professor Zhang   M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
ASIA, IR 364-10  Chinese Foreign Policy  43665  4 credits  (SS) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive)  
Research-oriented seminar focusing on the sources of Chinese foreign policy preferences and goals, foreign policy decision-making processes; international implications of the rise of China, and the pressing regional and global issues that China is facing now and in the future. Consent of department required. Department permission required. Professor He   F; 9:10 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA 371-10  Advanced Readings in Asian Studies  41806  1-4 credits  (HU, SS) CBE Global  
Directed course of reading and writing in advanced topic not covered in regular Asian Studies course offerings. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required. Instructor permission required. Professor Lee    
 
ASIA 381-10  Special Topics in Asian Studies  41808  1-4 credits  (HU, SS) CBE Global  
Advanced study of aspects of Asian studies not covered in regular course offerings. Individual faculty supervision. Research paper required. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required. Instructor permission required. Professor Lee    
 
ASIA 391-10  Senior Seminar in Asian Studies  41809  1-4 credits  (HU, SS) CBE Global  
Advanced seminar focusing on discussion and research on specialized subjects in Asian studies. Variable subject matter. Offered by faculty on rotating basis. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required. Instructor permission required. Professor Lee    
 
ASIA 399-11  Senior Thesis in Asian Studies  41374  1-4 credits  (HU, SS) CBE Global  
Advanced, individual research project on topic agreed between faculty and student. Research paper and oral defense required. May be repeated for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required. Instructor permission required. Professor Tannenbaum    
 
ASIA 399-10  Senior Thesis in Asian Studies  41810  1-4 credits  (HU, SS) CBE Global  
Advanced, individual research project on topic agreed between faculty and student. Research paper and oral defense required. May be repeated for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required. Instructor permission required. Professor Lee    
 
SUMMER 2017 COURSES
 
ASIA, SOC 197-10  Understanding China through Films (SS) CBE Global  4 credits CRN 21423
In order to really understand the social and cultural aspects of today’s Chinese society, it is of crucial importance to understand the drastic changes happened in China in the past 50 years. Using films to demonstrate how Chinese people experience and interpret the social and political events is one of the best ways to explain the often complicated causes and consequences of those dramatic social, political and economic changes.  The films used in this class are all closely related to some major social issues in China, and some of them were banned in China.  
Professor Zhang (SS 1) online
 
ASIA 361-10  Internship in Asian Studies (Lehigh in Shanghai Study Abroad - 3 credits) (HU, SS) CBE Global  1-4 credits CRN 20701
Internship in public or private agency involved in some aspect of Asian studies. Individual faculty mentor. Written report required. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required. Department permission required. Study Abroad.

Spring 2017 Course Listing

For Asian Studies courses requiring Department or Program Permission, please contact Dr. Kiri Lee at kjl2@lehigh.edu
 
ASIA, IR 063-010 U.S.-China Relations  CRN 14064   4 credits (SS)  
Introduction and analysis of the historical context and key aspects of contemporary US-China relations: Cold War US containment, rapprochement and diplomatic normalization; American arms sale and the Taiwan controversy; conflict and cooperation in the Korean Peninsula; economic interdependence and frictions; human rights and security relations; Asian regional disputes. Students may not receive credit for both IR/ASIA 063 and IR/ASIA 163.  Professor He T, R; 2:35-3:50 p.m. 
 
ASIA, WGSS, MLL 096-010  Sex, War,Women, Art  CRN 13314  4 credits (HU) CBE Diversity 
Through the study of selected visual, cinematic, and literary works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan.  We will examine various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society.  The material we will focus on includes (but not limited to):  1) The Twilight Samurai, a film depicting the romantic life of a samurai and his lover; 2) art works by Kusama Yayoi, a contemporary artist, known as the “dot lady” and nihonga by Matsui Fuyuko; 4) sex workers under the Japanese Empire in Okinawa, Shanghai, Colonial Korea, as well as women in Zainichi Korean communities.  The course is designed for students with and without previous knowledge of Japan.  No Japanese language ability is required.  All lectures and readings are in English.  Films are in Japanese with English subtitles.  Students who are interested in gender and sexuality in Japan, as well as colonial and postcolonial issues, impacted by the Japanese empire, are strongly encouraged to take this course.  By the end of the term, students will have acquired broad and critical knowledge of Japan.  The course is open to freshmen with the consultation of Professor Yamasaki (noy215@lehigh.edu).  Professor Yamasaki T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL 097-010  Protest Narrative Modern China  CRN 12594   4 credits (HU) CBE Global 
This course has three main objectives: first, to introduce the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, a significant historical event in modern China; second, to engage with Chinese novels, documentaries, and fiction-feature films that evoke this event; and third, to examine the effects of state censorship on culture.  The course is divided into three sections, with a paper due following each: Initial Responses, Between Public and Private, and Dystopic Visions.  Among the topics we will cover are China's capitalist transformation, mode of government, and personal vs. collective memory.  Each student will also present on a particular work in class.  All materials are available in English translation.  Professor Chen M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 
 
ASIA, PHIL 140-010  Eastern Philosophy  CRN 13103   4 credits (HU) CBE Global 
Survey of selected texts and issues in the eastern philosophical traditions. Attention will be given to the development and interrelations of these traditions as well as a comparison of western and eastern treatments of selected issues. Areas of focus may include Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism.  Professor Reihman T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL 165-010  Love and Revolution in Shanghai  CRN 13909  4 credits (HU) CBE Global 
This project-based course will examine human relationships and political-economic changes in Shanghai through the lens of literature, film, and a selection of other readings. Students will discuss the conflicts between and influences of pre-communist, communist, and capitalist systems as played out in the Shanghai area. Students will write research papers on aspects of historical or modern Shanghai, and present their results to the class. They will also be responsible for Course Site and in-class discussions of assigned readings and films.  Professor Cook M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, WGSS, REL 196-011  Sex, Celibacy and Sainthood: Gender and Religion in East Asia  CRN 13895  4 credits (HU) CBE Diversity
This course explores themes of sexuality, celibacy, gender and sainthood in East Asian Religions.  We will pay special attention to the experiences of religious women from many walks of life and time periods, from traditions including Buddhism, Daoism, and shamanism.  Through film, poetry, autobiography, philosophical writing, visual art, and description of visionary experience, students will encounter Buddhist and Daoist nuns, lay women, mothers, shamanic healers, oracles, activists, and royalty, from Tibet, Korea, Japan, China and the US.  Professor Pitkin T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA, REL, MLL 197-010  Drinking and Immortality  CRN 13908   4 credits (HU)  
This class explores modes of transcendence and their expression in literature and art, but most especially poetry. The primary focus is on the role of drinking alcoholic beverages in traditional Chinese society and religion, but also on other modes and what is meant by the search for immortality—and the use of inner versus outer alchemy—will be examined.  Professor Cook M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
ASIA, GS, REL 247-010  Islamic Mysticism  CRN 13341  4 credits (HU) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive) 
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose.  Professor Rozehnal T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, ES, REL 254-010  Buddhism and Ecology  CRN 13344   4 credits (HU) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive) 
Buddhism's intellectual, ethical, and spiritual resources and reexamined in light of contemporary environmental problems. Is Buddhism the most green of the major world religions? What are the moral implications of actions that affect the environment?  Professor Pitkin T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
**CANCELED**ASIA, WGSS, POLS 296-010  Women's Movement in China  CRN 14217   4 credits  
This course examines the state-directed movement for women's liberation in mainland China from the end of the imperial system (called "The May Fourth Era") through the Communist Era when the Communist Party in China was lead by Chairman Mao Tsetung and into the contemporary era of "reform and opening" to the non-Communist world, beginning in 1978 and on to the present. While discussing many aspects of this movement, we will focus our attention on three issues: (1) identity and the development of women's political consciousness, (2) female labor force participation, and (3) sexuality, fertility, motherhood and population control. How have these issues been framed throughout China's modern history? How has this framing directed the development of women's individual and collective sense of power and agency? Professor Fennell T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA 371-010  Advanced Readings in Asian Studies  CRN 10349   1-4 credits (HU, SS) CBE Global 
 
ASIA 381-010  Special Topics in Asian Studies  CRN 10353  1-4 credits (HU, SS) CBE Global 
 
ASIA 391-010  Senior Seminar in Asian Studies  CRN  1-4 credits (HU, SS) CBE Global 
 
ASIA 399-010  Senior Thesis in Asian Studies  CRN 10355   1-4 credits (HU, SS) CBE Global 
 

Fall 2016 Course Listing

ASIA, REL 012-10  Mountains, Buddhas, Anncestors: Introduction to East Asian Religions CRN 43740 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
This course explores the principal religions of Asia, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.  What is each tradition's view of human potential?  How is ultimate reality depicted and experienced?  What do home altars, boisterous festivals, and silent meditation halls have in common?  Several primary texts are read in translation.  Professor Pitkin T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, IR 061-10  East Asian International Relations CRN 43529 (SS) CBE Global  3-4 credits 
Introduction to East Asian international relations, with emphasis on post-1945 period: historical background of Asian international system; Cold War conflicts; China's rise and regional responses; Japan's changing international role; the two Koreas; ASEAN and Asian regionalism; U.S. and Russian policies; current and future issues.  Professor He M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
ASIA, MLL, HIST 075-10  Chinese Civilization CRN 43318 (HU, SS) CBE Global  4 credits 
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective, from earliest times to China’s encounter with the West.  Professor Cook M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, REL, GS 077-10  The Islamic Tradition CRN 43710 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
A thematic introduction to Islamic history, doctrine and practice. Topics include: Qur’an; prophecy and sacred history; ritual practices; community life; legal interpretation; art and aesthetics; mysticism; politics and polemics.  Professor Rozehnal
M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, MLL 090-10 Dreaming in Pre-Modern China  CRN 43739 (HU) 4 credits
The novel, Dream of the Red Chamber, takes the readers into the bedrooms, dreams, and secret gardens of a large gentry family of the late 17th century in China. There are ghosts, goddesses, and scabby priests that thread their ways amont the find ladies and not-so-honorable men. To add to the mystery is the supernatural origin of the main character who must relearn his true self through life among mortals (or semi-mortals). This text functions not only as the Shakespeare of China, the foundation of modern literature, but is known throughout Asia in multiple forms of popular cultural media.  Students will read a four-volume edition of the 120-chapter classic and prepare discussion points for class. After finishing each volume, there will be an in-class essay. Each student will prepare one 10-15 minute presentation researching some aspect of life at that time or of the novel. For extra credit, students can rewrite their essays or do a second presentation. First-year seminar, restricted to incoming CAS first-year students.  Dean’s permission required.  Professor Cook  M, W; 110:10 – 12:25 p.m.
 
ASIA, SOC 114-10  Social Issues in Contemporary China CRN 43810 (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 
Dramatic economic, cultural and social changes are underway in China today and have aroused much debate among social scientists East and West.  The following social issues are critical for understanding China's development trajectory: in equality and poverty; rapid demographic shifts; provision of health care services; provision of education services; and becoming an "information society."  We will explore how these issues intersect with old hierarchies in China, urban-rural differences, and gender differences.  
Professor Zhang T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ASIA, REL, GS 145-10  Islam And The Modern World CRN 43712 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
Examines how numerous Muslim thinkers-religious scholars, modernists, and Islamists-have responded to the changes and challenges of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Special emphasis is placed on the public debates over Islamic authority and authenticity in contemporary South Asia.  Professor Hussain T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
ASIA, REL 172-10  Tibetan Buddhism and Society CRN 44065 (HU) WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 
This course examines the history, rituals, practices and art of the Tibetan Buddhist world, and the interaction of Tibetan Buddhism with the Tibetan Bon religion and Tibetan Islam. Students will explore film, autobiography, visual arts, and religious writings, asking, How has Tibetan Buddhism shaped Tibetan societies, as well as neighboring cultures in East Asia and Inner Asia? In what ways is Tibetan Buddhism now a global religion?  Professor Pitkin T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ASIA, REL, ANTH 196-10  Buddhism and Anthropology CRN 43741 (SS)   4 credits 
Anthropologists have done research in communities where the people practice Buddhism. In this course we will read a number of anthropological case studies to explore how anthropological understandings of Buddhism have changed through time.  In the process we will learn about basic Buddhist concepts and Buddhism as a lived religion.  We will also explore Buddhist ideas about gender, life cycle, and “the good life”.  The goal is to develop a broad, comparative understanding of Buddhism and anthropology.  Professor Tannenbaum M, W, F; 2:10 - 3:00 p.m.
 
**CANCELLED**ASIA, MLL, WGSS 197-10  Women, Native and Others CRN 43760 (HU)   4 credits 
Through the study of selected literary and cinematic works in their historical and cultural contexts, students will gain knowledge of key issues in Japanese society. The students will explore works written by a popular writer, Murakami Haruki; a 'burakumin' (outcaste) writer, Nakagami Kenji; and a Catholic writer, Endo Shusaku. We will also examine some anime in a critical manner, not merely as the object of consumption. Gender and sexuality will be key analytical categories to analyze all these texts. No knowledge of the Japanese language or of Japanese literature is required; all texts will be read in English translation. The class will be taught in English.   Professor Yamasaki T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ASIA, POLS, GS 339-10  The Rise of the State in Modern East Asia CRN 43719 (SS) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 
An examination of Asian nationalism in the construction of the modern state form in Asia. Department permission required. Professor Fennell M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, IR 364-10  Chinese Foreign Policy CRN 44257 (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 
Research-oriented seminar focusing on the sources of Chinese foreign policy preferences and goals, foreign policy decision-making processes; international implications of the rise of China, and the pressing regional and global issues that China is facing now and in the future. Consent of department required.  Professor He M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA 371 Advanced Readings in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic)   1-4 credits 
Directed course of reading and writing in advanced topic not covered in regular Asian Studies course offerings. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required.
Section 10, CRN 41892 – Professor Lee
Section 11, CRN 43465  – Professor Tannenbaum
 
ASIA 381 Special Topics in Asian Studies CRN 41895 (HU/SS depending on topic)   1-4 credits 
Advanced study of aspects of Asian studies not covered in regular course offerings. Individual faculty supervision. Research paper required. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required.   Professor Lee
 
ASIA 391 Senior Seminar in Asian Studies CRN 41896 (HU/SS depending on topic)   1-4 credits 
Advanced seminar focusing on discussion and research on specialized subjects in Asian studies. Variable subject matter. Offered by faculty on rotating basis. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required.   
for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required.   Professor Lee
 
ASIA 399 Senior Thesis in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic)   1-4 credits 
Advanced, individual research project on topic agreed between faculty and student. Research paper and oral defense required. May be repeated for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required.   
Section 10 CRN 41897 – Professor Lee
Section 11 CRN 43679  – Professor Tannenbaum
 

Spring 2016 Course Listing

For Asian Studies courses requiring Department or Program Permission, please contact Dr. Kiri Lee at kjl2@lehigh.edu
 
ASIA, IR 062-10 US-China Relations (SS)   4 credits 
Introduction and analysis of the historical context and key aspects of contemporary US-China relations: Korean War, Vietnam War, and US containment; rapprochement and diplomatic normalization; American arms sale and the Taiwan controversy; conflict and cooperation in Korean Peninsular; economic interdependence and frictions; human rights, climate change, and cybersecurity; security relations; response to regional disputes.  
Professor He M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL, GCP, WGSS 073-10 Film, Fiction, and Gender in Modern China (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 
Study of the struggle for an individual “modern” identity out of traditionally defined roles for men and women as depicted by Chinese writers and filmmakers. Class, texts, and films in English. Students interested in setting up a corollary Chinese language component for credit as Chin 251, may discuss this possibility with the professor.  
Professor Cook M, W; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA, REL, MLL 095-10 Monkey Business (HU)   4 credits 
The search for immortality by Monkey, kongfu master and mischievous monk, is one of the most popular tales in Asia. A combination of comedy and religious quest, the traditional novel Journey to the West is filled with tricks and lively storytelling that teach without preaching. The class will read the entire novel looking carefully at the social context of its production but also its timeless lessons for transcendence.
Professor Cook M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL, WGSS 096-10 Sex Workers, Samurai Women, and Women Artists in Japan (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 
Through the study of selected visual, cinematic, and literary works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan.  We will examine various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society.  The material we will focus on includes (but not limited to):  1) The Twilight Samurai, a film depicting the romantic life of a samurai and his lover; 2) art works by Kusama Yayoi, a contemporary artist, known as the “dot lady” and nihonga by Matsui Fuyuko; 4) sex workers under the Japanese Empire in Okinawa, Shanghai, Colonial Korea, as well as women in Zainichi Korean communities.    The course is designed for students with and without previous knowledge of Japan.  No Japanese language ability is required.  All lectures and readings are in English.  Films are in Japanese with English subtitles.  Students who are interested in gender and sexuality in Japan, as well as colonial and postcolonial issues, impacted by the Japanese empire, are strongly encouraged to take this course.  By the end of the term, students will have acquired broad and critical knowledge of Japan.  The course is open to freshmen with the consultation of Professor Nobuko Yamasaki (noy215@lehigh.edu).  
Professor Yamasaki T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA, MLL, STS 097-10 Science & Technology in Traditional China (HU) CBE Global 4 credits 
This course is an interdisciplinary study on exploring traditional technologies developed over thousands of years in China. The course is designed for students who are interested in the history of science and technology, particularly in cross‐culture comparisons of  raditional Western and Eastern craft techniques.  No knowledge of Chinese is required.  Although during the past 5000 years there have been many inventions in China that impacted world history (e.g., gunpowder, the compass, moveable type print), in the class the following aspects of traditional Chinese crafts and technologies are reviewed in details: Unit 1 of Chinese traditional architecture, Unit 2 of Silk and the Silk Road, Unit 3 of Ceramic and Metallurgy, and Unit 4 of Paper making and Chinese calligraphy.  
Professor Wang M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
ASIA, PHIL 140-10 Eastern Philosophy (HU) 4 credits 
Survey of selected texts and issues in the eastern philosophical traditions. Attention will be given to the development and interrelations of these traditions as well as a comparison of western and eastern treatments of selected issues. Areas of focus may include Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism.  
Professor Bliss M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, REL, GS 196-10 The Podcast and the Lotus (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 
Buddhism has traveled far from its Indian birthplace, and is increasingly a global phenomenon.  Contemporary Buddhist teachers circle the globe, and may stay in touch with students via podcasts, WeChat, Twitter and Facebook.  Buddhists from Singapore, Tibet, Japan, Mexico, Taiwan or Pennsylvania can now meet face to face or virtually, via new technology.  This class asks, in what ways is Buddhism now a global religion, and what effect has this had?  In what ways is Buddhism a "modern religion, and what might that mean?  Students will explore issues of conversion, modernity, globalization, new technology, migration and travel, through sources including autobiography, film, travel writing, political essays, interviews, social media and ethnography.  
Professor Pitkin M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, POLS, GS 201-10 Democracy and Dictatorship in South Asia (SS) 4 credits 
Theories of democracy and democratization explored in the South Asian context.  Relationship of democracy to economic development and identity considered.  How do historical legacies and conflict shape contemporary outcomes?  
Professor Deo T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
ASIA, REL, GS 247-10 Islamic Mysticism (HU) WI (Writing Intensive) 4 credits 
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose  
Professor Rozehnal M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
ASIA, REL, ES 254-10 Buddhism and Ecology (HU) 4 credits 
Buddhism's intellectual, ethical, and spiritual resources and reexamined in light of contemporary environmental problems. Is Buddhism the most green of the major world religions? What are the moral implications of actions that affect the environment?  
Professor Pitkin M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
ASIA, POLS, AAS, GS 343-10 Global Politics of Race: Asia and Africa (SS) CBE Diversity 4 credits 
An examination of the concept of “race” and its impact on domestic and international politics.  
Professor Fennell T; 4:10 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 
 
ASIA 371 Advanced Readings in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic) 1-4 credits 
Directed course of reading and writing in advanced topic not covered in regular Asian Studies course offerings. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required.
Section 10 – Professor Lee
Section 11 – Professor Tannenbaum
 
ASIA 381 Special Topics in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic) 1-4 credits 
Advanced study of aspects of Asian studies not covered in regular course offerings. Individual faculty supervision. Research paper required. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required.  
Professor Lee
 
ASIA 391 Senior Seminar in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic) 1-4 credits 
Advanced seminar focusing on discussion and research on specialized subjects in Asian studies. Variable subject matter. Offered by faculty on rotating basis. May be repeated for credit. Program permission required for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required.  
Professor Lee
 
ASIA 399 Senior Thesis in Asian Studies (HU/SS depending on topic) 1-4 credits 
Advanced, individual research project on topic agreed between faculty and student. Research paper and oral defense required. May be repeated for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. Program permission required.   
Section 10 – Professor Lee
Section 11 – Professor Tannenbaum
 

Fall 2015 Course Listing

For Asian Studies courses requiring Department or Program Permission, please contact Dr. Kiri Lee at kjl2@lehigh.edu

ASIA, IR 061-10 East Asian International Relations  4 credits (SS)  CBE Global
Introduction to East Asian international relations, with emphasis on post-1945 period: historical background of Asian international system; Cold War conflicts; China's rise and regional responses; Japan's changing international role; the two Koreas; ASEAN and Asian regionalism; U.S. and Russian policies; current and future issues. 
Professor He;  M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

ASIA, MLL, HIST 075-10 Chinese Civilization  4 credits (HU/SS)  CBE Global
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective, from earliest times to China’s encounter with the West. 
Professor Cook;  M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

IR 090-12 Japan in A Changing World (freshmen seminar)
Prime Minister Abe Shinzo's historic visit to the US this April, which finalized the revision of their defense cooperation guidelines and rendered a first-ever address to a joint session of the US Congress by a Japanese leader, marks a new era in both US-Japan alliance and Japanese foreign policy. Yet Japan remains enmeshed in tensions with some of its important Asian neighbors caused by WWII history 70 years ago. This course aims at understanding Japan’s paradoxical responses to the outside world from the Meiji period until today. Issues to be covered include imperialism, pacifism, war guilt and redress, national strategy, economic conflict and cooperation, energy security, interactions with international institutions, and policy toward major regional players.
Professor He; 
M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.

ASIA, MLL 090-10 Dreaming in Pre-Modern China  4 credits (HU) Dean permissin required
The novel, Dream of the Red Chamber, takes the readers into the bedrooms, dreams, and secret gardens of a large gentry family of the late 17th century in China. There are ghosts, goddesses, and scabby priests that thread their ways amont the find ladies and not-so-honorable men. To add to the mystery is the supernatural origin of the main character who must relearn his true self through life among mortals (or semi-mortals). This text functions not only as the Shakespeare of China, the foundation of modern literature, but is known throughout Asia in multiple forms of popular cultural media.  Students will read a four-volume edition of the 120-chapter classic and prepare discussion points for class. After finishing each volume, there will be an in-class essay. Each student will prepare one 10-15 minute presentation researching some aspect of life at that time or of the novel. For extra credit, students can rewrite their essays or do a second presentation. 
Professor Cook;  M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.

ASIA, REL, PHIL 097-10  Intro to Buddhism: Love, Death and Freedom   4 credits (HU)
This course will introduce students to Buddhist practices, philosophical systems, and cultural forms, from Buddhism's Indian origins to its spread in East Asia and Tibet. Students will explore how  Buddhists have approached the problem of death, the possibility of freedom, and forms of social and individual love and concern. Course materials include poetry, biographies, philosophical writings, art, and film.
Professor Pitkin; T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

ASIA, MLL 097-11 Introduction to Traditional Crafts & Technologies in China 4 credits (HU)
Through the study of traditional architecture, textiles, paper-making, and metallurgy that developed over thousands of years of Chinese history, students will explore a few key Chinese technologies that expanded later by sea or overland (the Silk Road) into other regions in Asia and elsewhere. Students will also be encouraged to explore other Chinese inventions such as gunpowder and the compass, as part of individual projects.|
Professor Wang; M, W 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.

ASIA, REL, GS 146-10 Islam in South Asia  4 credits (HU)  CBE Global
A survey of the dynamic encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations. Topics include: Islamic identity, piety and practice; art and aesthetic traditions; intercommunal exchange and conflict; the colonial legacy; and the politics of contemporary religious nationalism. 
Professor Hussain;  T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

ASIA, PHIL 198-10 Zen and the Art of the Everyday: Japanese Aesthetics  4 credits (HU)  CBE Global
The Japanese conception of beauty is strikingly different to our own: it is associated with impermanence, imperfection, and austerity.  Moreover, an attention to beauty seems to pervade even the most everyday of activities in Japan, such as wrapping purchases at the dollar store or putting out garbage.  In this course we will explore the principles that guide the Japanese aesthetic sensibility with a particular eye to its expression in Japanese literature, film, and various of the traditional arts, such as the tea ceremony and gardening, amongst still others. 
Professor Bliss;  M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.

ASIA 371 Advanced Readings in Asian Studies  1-4 credits (HU/SS depending on topic)  Instructor permission required
Directed course of reading and writing in advanced topic not covered in regular Asian Studies course offerings. May be repeated for credit. 

ASIA 381 Special Topics in Asian Studies  1-4 credits (HU/SS depending on topic)  Instructor permission required
Advanced study of aspects of Asian studies not covered in regular course offerings. Individual faculty supervision. Research paper required. May be repeated for credit. 

ASIA 391 Senior Seminar in Asian Studies  1-4 credits (HU/SS depending on topic)  Instructor permission required
Advanced seminar focusing on discussion and research on specialized subjects in Asian studies. Variable subject matter. Offered by faculty on rotating basis. May be repeated for credit. 

ASIA 399-10 Senior Thesis in Asian Studies  1-4 credits (HU/SS depending on topic) Instructor permission required
Advanced, individual research project on topic agreed between faculty and student. Research paper and oral defense required. May be repeated for credit. Open to Asian studies majors only. 


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